Tuesday’s Inspiration: Marc

Franz Marc
The Tower of Blue Horses
1913

Long admired by myself, this painting is by one of my favorite artists, Franz Marc. I’ve always loved the sweeping movement in his paintings, the curves in the horses necks, and the geometry he used to render organic figures. Though this is not the actual painting, I like the muted version of The Tower of Blue Horses shown above. A more true to life version can be viewed here.  Another rendering can be viewed here. I didn’t realize this, but in my research on this post I discovered that this painting has actually been missing since the end of World War II. Sadly, it fell victim to Nazi opinions on modern art and was removed from  the National Gallery in Berlin in 1937. Later, Hitler personally ordered the painting be removed from a second art exhibit because he declared it to be “degenerate”.  Subsequently, the painting was lost. I wonder if it is still out in the world somewhere? I do hope it was not destroyed completely.

Marc himself also fell victim to war. At age 36, he was killed in the Battle of Verdun in 1916.

What ravages war has brought.

Tuesday’s Inspiration: Jan Mankes

_Jan_Mankes_-_View_studio_in_Eerbeek__1889View from the Studio in Eerbeek

Jan Mankes

1917

 

This is how I felt on my walk today. It was a bit dreary. We are in the midst of the February doldrums. Despite the dreary vibe, this picture holds a certain beauty. I love the tones, and that background with the house sort of blurring into the trees. The bare branches of the tree and hedgerow. And the little flock of birds, reminding us to look around and notice things to be thankful for. I had to tell myself that today while I was out walking in fact. I was feeling a bit off and said in my head, “find something beautiful”. I looked up and noticed a stand of young birch trees. I focused on them and for a minute wasn’t focusing on my chilly ears, or tired body, or unsettled thoughts. It always helps to find and focus on the beauty. I found this painting on Pinterest a few weeks ago. It is a fitting image to share for Tuesday’s Inspiration.

Tuesday’s Inspiration: Percy Bysshe Shelley

Is it too early to be dreaming of spring? I don’t think so. The sun is around so much longer these days. It’s really just around the corner. I found this poem on one of my favorite websites (This Ivy House) this morning, and I love how spring is expressed in it. I wanted to share it with you, my faithful readers (all 2 of you! 🙂 haha). So here is an excerpt from To Jane: The Invitation by Percy Bysshe Shelley via the Poetry Foundation.

Bending from Heaven, in azure mirth,
It kissed the forehead of the Earth,
And smiled upon the silent sea,
And bade the frozen streams be free,
And waked to music all their fountains,
And breathed upon the frozen mountains,
And like a prophetess of May
Strewed flowers upon the barren way,
Making the wintry world appear
Like one on whom thou smilest, dear.
Away, away, from men and towns,
To the wild wood and the downs—
To the silent wilderness
Where the soul need not repress
Its music lest it should not find
An echo in another’s mind.
While the touch of Nature’s art
Harmonizes heart to heart.

New Hampshire in Mid-Winter

It’s been an icy, icy world out there lately. December and January seemed especially brutal with days on end of sub-zero temperatures, wind, and a couple of ice storms. On New Years Day, with just 2 degrees on the thermometer, Ethan and I set out for a northern adventure. We just had to get out of the house! And we wanted to see the snowy mountains. We bundled up and hit the road, temperature plummeting the more Northward we drove. fullsizeoutput_2cfa

fullsizeoutput_2cfcWe meandered through small towns, such as Grafton and Warren. We tried to take smaller, back roads as we went. Route 118 from Warren to North Woodstock was particularly scenic. From there, we jumped on highway 93 North so we could go through the Notch. The Notch was socked in with fog it was so cold, but the glimpses we got of the mountains were beautiful.fullsizeoutput_2cf6After a quick stop at the Garnet Hill Outlet in Franconia, we made our way to Sugar Hill for a late lunch at Polly’s Pancake Parlor. Situated on a hill overlooking a gorgeous mountain view, Polly’s has quite the spot. If only the food lived up to the location. I hate doling out bad reviews, but the food just wasn’t that great. But the options were many, so perhaps we just made some bad choices (I had the quiche of the day and Ethan had a reuben as per usual). Their peppermint cappuccino on the other hand- yum, yum.

fullsizeoutput_2cfdAfter our lunch, we went over to Sunset Hill in Sugar Hill to take in the view above. Still a  little foggy, but lovely none the less. We were starting to lose light, so we meandered towards home from there, though we were far from it. We went through some little New Hampshire towns that I had never seen before. Most interestingly, we stumbled upon The Brick Store in Bath which is on the National Register of Historic Places as the oldest general store in the country- how cool! It had loads of old character, we had to go in and have a look around. Thankfully, we caught them just before they closed for the day. My favorite thing was the wide front porch with all the rocking chairs. Too bad it was below zero out, it would be fun to sit there and enjoy a treat from the store. fullsizeoutput_2d66

fullsizeoutput_2d68

Other towns of note were Haverhill and Etna. Both new to me, and both very colonial and charming. The moon was rising when we were in Haverhill, so by the time we drove through Etna, it was too dark for photos. Haverhill is along Route 10 in New Hampshire, and Etna is situated atop a hill off a side road- you’ll have to use your GPS to find it, but it’s worth finding- well, hopefully, I did only see it in the dark. fullsizeoutput_2d67fullsizeoutput_2d65Well that was our little mid-winter, sub-zero, just-have-to-get-out-of-the-house adventure! Hopefully we can repeat it in warmer temperatures. There’s a certain rocking chair in Bath calling out to me…

Tuesday’s Inspiration: Audrey Hepburn

9c23646b10476d89af73d43aaefce017

08d092877812a612988289aa56b88832

585ca5f8325721f319cfebb7aa4bb328

Audrey Hepburn, 1967. Photographed by Terry O’Neill.

I’m laid up on bed rest from a recent surgery and using my time to catch up on all the classic movies I’ve never seen. Film, Hollywood, movie stars, classics: none of it is my cup of tea. However, I have always wanted to see Audrey Hepburn movies, just to see what it’s all about. Yup, I can see why people love her. She’s a charming person to watch on the screen, and I love her vintage style. I watched Roman Holiday yesterday and I have My Fair Lady on the docket for today. In addition to Audrey Hepburn movies, I also have Casablanca, The Sound of Music, Citizen Cane, On Golden Pond, and Out of Africa.

What other classic movies would you recommend?

Tuesday’s Inspiration: Lilla Cabot Perry

0b2312a8597bd9cd97c58e9e196a1579
Lilla Cabot Perry
The Silver Vase
1905

Isn’t she a beauty? I searched for paintings by this artist when I learned she had a summer home in Hancock, New Hampshire. There is also a small portrait of a child Perry painted on display at the Hancock Town Library which is captivating. I had to see more, so I searched for Perry’s works and found this one, The Silver Vase. Dressed in the colors of winter, I thought she was a fitting symbol of this January day.

Making this post led me to do a bit more research on Perry and what I found was delightful:

  • She had no formal art training until the age of 36
  • Though she was born in Boston, Massachusetts her family traveled widely and lived in various places around the globe, including Paris, Munich, and Japan which really influenced her painting styles and subjects through the years.
  • She saw a Claude Monet painting at age 41 (in 1889) and so admired it that her family rented a house in Giverny, France (where Monet resided) for 9 summers. Monet became her close friend and mentor – imagine!!
  • Monet encouraged Perry to “commit her first impression of a scene to canvas rather than to sketchbook” (Encyclopedia Britannica) – what a gorgeous thought.
  • Her later paintings are inspired by the landscapes around her summer home in Hancock, New Hampshire where she died and was laid to rest.

I found the bulleted information above on the National Museum of Women in the Arts website and the Encyclopedia Britannica website. What a fascinating woman! And how cool she had such a connection to Hancock, New Hampshire.

What is inspiring you this week? Do share

 

SaveSave

Postcards from Paris

May 2008. A dream fulfilled: a trip to Paris with my best friend! Here are my favorite photos from our arrival day. I will periodically share subsequent days of the trip as I finish editing them. I took the photographs 10 years ago and am just now getting around to editing them! haha! I’m a major photo procrastinator. But I’m glad I waited in a way, as I can delete photos more easily and edit in a nostalgic style, which suits Paris. You must forgive the slightly grainy photo quality as these were taken with my first little 5 megapixel camera. Enjoy~fullsizeoutput_2ab4



fullsizeoutput_2aa1fullsizeoutput_2aac

fullsizeoutput_2a92

fullsizeoutput_2a60fullsizeoutput_2a6dfullsizeoutput_2a8b

fullsizeoutput_2a70

fullsizeoutput_2a91fullsizeoutput_2a75


fullsizeoutput_2a62

  • My first siting of the Arc D’triumph in our taxi from the airport.
  • The gorgeous architecture of the buildings (I was in awe) and the sights and smells of the open air food market near our hotel.
  • The Eiffel Tower! We went right up it- fantastic views!
  • Locals playing some bocce ball in the park near the tower.
  • The street view of Napoleon’s gold dome burial spot.
  • Wandering the streets in a light rain.
  • Enjoying a creme brûlée for dessert.
  • The tower lit up at night from our hotel room’s balcony.

Looking back on these, I appreciate all the more what a beautiful city Paris is. I’m so thankful I was able to see it with my own eyes. I would love to visit again someday, along with the french countryside. More to come….

Tuesday’s Inspiration: Paul Gauguin

This is an old idea of mine, resurfaced: Tuesday’s Inspiration. On one of my long ago blog attempts, I used to post something simple every Tuesday- something meaningful, beautiful and inspiring. I want to get back to this practice in order to share with you some of the artworks and writings of others that I find most inspiring. I love the spread of inspiration! Have an excellent Tuesday my friends 🙂

21c40d8b7bcc7d1961a94a60c9e7c7df

Kneeling Cow
Paul Gauguin
1888

I chose to share this favorite painting of mine, Kneeling Cow, as I think of it very often: every time I see a cow in fact. Cows generally aren’t called ‘beautiful’ however, this cow is, and has made me view all the cows I see as beautiful. Just look at the profile Gauguin captured! The shape of his sweet nose, his calm mouth, and knobby knees. I don’t know, this painting just gets me. Additionally, this week I’ve been reading an excellent homesteading book before bed: Ben Hewitt’s The Nourishing Homestead : One Back-to-the-Land Family’s Plan for Cultivating Soil, Skills, and Spirit. I just started the chapter on keeping animals, so again, Gauguin’s Kneeling Cow has been on my mind and heart.

What’s inspiring you today? Do share.

SaveSave

My Artist’s Statement

this place:
ten years of photography near and far by Callista Faucher
artist’s statement.
______________________________________________________________

         This body of work examines the interesting juxtaposition between the exhilaration of exploring new places and the comfort of finding beauty in the familiar surroundings of home. Travel has always called to me; yet, at the same time, home time draws me too. Wander and explore, or put down roots? A perennial question, and a question I’m so thankful that I have the circumstances to ask. I’m eternally grateful for the trips I’ve taken, along with the beauty of my home that has made these images possible. Whether near or far, I try to keep in mind the quote by Walt Whitman from which the name of this show was taken: happiness, not in another place, but this place. Not for another hour, but this hour. Photography helps me to do just that: to be happy in the present moment. This is good. Dreamer by nature, idealistic almost to a fault: I am often thinking about the next thing. The click of the shutter however, grounds me in the here and now. Photography helps me to really see what is in front of me and to derive happiness from the beauty inherent in all of the ordinary and extraordinary places in which we live out life’s moments.
Along with exploring happiness and presence in different places, this show is also a story of my growth as a photographer. In the making of these images, I’ve never been laden with bulky equipment, nor do I rely on hefty zoom lenses, tripods, or image stabilization. I don’t use a flash. I’ve always enjoyed physically moving to get a shot, at times being on my hands and knees, sneaking up on a shot, or making myself look crazy to get an angle. When I first started shooting, I used a Fugifilm Finepix digital camera. At just 5 megapixels, it was a pretty lousy camera, yet I was so happy to have it, and I took some shots that I am still fond of today. At the time, I was a fan of really editing my photos: I loved a cross-processed look, deep sepia tones, sharp contrasts: making things look a bit larger than life. Some of those shots are included in this show, because it wouldn’t be an honest portrayal of my artistic growth if I left them out. I eventually saved up my pennies (literally) and bought a Nikon D5000 DSLR in 2009. It’s wide angle lens helped to develop my love for sweeping landscapes. These days, I like a more subdued look and gravitate towards calming scenes with minimal editing.
I’ve always known I wanted to “make art” and “be an artist”, yet I never considered myself one. I was quite narrow minded and grew up imagining that to “be an artist” one had to be wealthy and connected; I thought of it as some sort of out-of-my-reach privilege. But really, I was just getting in my own way: months would pass and I would create little. I was paralyzed by indecision; having too many ideas but never acting on any. I made excuses. I was busy, always busy. All the while though, the creativity and inspiration were building inside of me. At times, I felt as though I would burst. It always made me sad and overwhelmed that I hadn’t created anything. And yet, going through this body of work, putting this show together, I realize now that I’ve been creating all along: these photos are my art. These places captured have made me an artist. All the times I was moved to click that shutter, I was creating. Little bits of beauty, pure happiness, moments captured: these were and are my inspiration and motivation. I’ve been unknowingly making these images for 10 years now and I’m so happy I finally got out of my own way to display them for you. I hope you enjoy my work, and I thank you sincerely for your interest in it.

Time is suspended in this place: in all the places you and I have been.

________________________________________________________________

Go out and see the show! Through February 14th in the Daniel’s Room at the Hancock Town Library, Hancock, New Hampshire. grove

RefugeGrove, On Wings, and Refuge : 3 of my oldest (and most favorite) photographs.